Lunch Options

End of month passed, weekend away, payday a couple of days away – the cupboard is bare.   Why do I balk at taking cheerios for lunch?   Given the options are dehydrated borsche, wasabi-covered chickpeas, a kilo of saurkraut and a tablespoon of blue cheese, you’d think I’d be going with the cheerios.

The Tree

The Tree of Knowledge, that is.

Why can’t we have the following components of the internet put together today:

  • open source collaboration
  • creating a central web application which
  • uses RSS aggregation
  • to search by keyword
  • to report on everything available on the internet
  • and file it in publicly available space
  • classified according to an taxonomy of all understanding cascading from the general to specific in every field.

Add open source blogging tools available free with RSS feeds and all writers can pour what is known into the system by writing on their own pages. An automated global wiki.   The indexed internet, the free digital usable useful library.

Essay on weblogs

This is a good discussion of the phenomena of weblogs/PWPs, care of Rob1 (via right).

[I’ll have to think about this given the stats and relative adoption rates compared to ham radio.]

Later: I congratulate Rob1.

This is the best statement of where weblogs are today that I have read. It does not backaway from either the overriding hobby aspect as well as its placement on a continuum that reaches at least into the early 90’s as opposed to a new phenomena created by current players.

I am interested in the co-mingling of weblogs and open source and how idea sharing – especially outside of the realms of technology and science – can facilitate the expansion of the uncommoditized world. I remain unsure of the point of aggregation other than that we now can as I see them as a buffer to meaning and community rather than a tool for these. The noise is too great, the opportunity to receive too limited to go beyond superficiality.

I am suspicious of anything calling itself a “tipping point” as I have gone though too many “paradigm shifts” which were little more than a consultant creating a new word. Also, it is not structurally democratic external to itself, given the digital divide(s), however much participants believe themselves a new democractic thing – too much great man theory for that.

I am looking for the unified tool of RSS – not my interests but all interests indexed, an eBay of ideas where I can find any interest discussed in increatingly detailed sub-groups of further detail – a usenet without active participation drawing on content from feeds from open source platform blogs made available to everyone. Is that there yet? It is too much to ask for?

Later Later: The author, Andrew2, is now linked right.


My new rock pals

There are 12 cicadas buzzing non-stop in my ears this morning. It was so loud, the air in the room shimmered and my pant legs flapped with the bass notes. It was great.

I bought tickets yesterday morning for me and Nate but when I got home this was on the email:

Hey dude;

Sorry… just got your message. No… I’m in halifax. But you are on the guest list plus one. Mike Nelson is the tour manager…find him if there is any problem. Tickets are in your name so pick them up anyway as they are likely better seats. also, backstage passes if you are in the mood to introduce yourself to the boys. The tour manager knows you might stop by. have fun!

Despite my hopefully short term loss of a broad range of frequencies, it was great being the kings of rows G, H and I – before the show kids (I mean kids) were hanging over chairs asking how we got the backstage passes. Rather than explain a long time ago I knew a Guy from a Library in Halifax and he and I both became lawyers, he representing Sloan, I a little web company called silverorange and one day I figured there might be something in an introduction…I said “we do Sloan’s web page”. Our coolness spread into portions of row J and was so intensely felt by one guy that he jumped into the row behind us and told us that he had seen Sloan four times so far this year, that he was in Kingston from U. of A. in Calgary for a conference and then told us a bunch of stuff using words I really didn’t recognize but they were generally variants of cool. He was a fan.

We went backstage before and after, got a rock hug from Chris, talked about ear plugs with the grey Dads of the band and resisted the temptation to grab a beer and sandwich. Chatted about how I watched some of them in earlier incarnations Kearney Lake Road and Blackpool and felt like a dweeb later for being the needy guy but then not so bad as the Chris Murphy chickenburger vintage hoodie sparked a discussion of good stuff that included my 60’s St. Pats High sweatshirt. The show was loud, loud, loud in line with the volume of the new records, Action Pact. Lots of high kicks, roadie exchanges of guitars each of I wanted to lick (the guitars not the roadies) and a ten foot-high flashing strobing arc of tube lighting behind them the width of the stage that confirmed I am not epileptic. “Losing California” was very good. They switched instruments around for “Sensory Deprivation” with Chris on drums, Jay on bass which got very loose. They started to play with us making us shout “hey” on the back of a bo-diddly beat between songs and later all crouch down quiet in our seats until a certain point in the song when we all had to jump up at the perfect rock moment. It was a big loud sing-song.

I have pictures from Nate but I guess he doesn’t know the internet so well as he sent them all as 1,000 kb files which I have to figure out how to reduce. I guess he figured I wanted my signed forearm printed out as a poster – which I might yet do, now that I tihnk about it. Photos, then, later.

Being Scanned

Once or twice before – over the six months of this blog – I have checked my referral logs and found some bot was looking at every link on my front page. Tonight the bot was this one.   I wonder what’s in their sphere of autonomy. I wonder anyone reads this after the scan and is it:

person: ming mao
nic-hdl: MM134-AP
address: Floor #3, Building A, ZhongGuanCun Sci-Tech
address: Development Mansion, South ZhongGuanCun Street
address: HaiDian district, Beijing 100081,China

Probably just the ISP guy.  Gam bey, Ming Mao.

Life as TV

Home sick, blowing nose, changing diaper, I’ve been looking a lot at one screen or another and listening to speakers. Watched West Wing last night. Read this about Rumsfeld and a memo with questions about the war on terror today. [Today is important because CNN said this afternoon that it is actually the 20th anniversary of the beginning of the war on terror – I think it being the anniversary of the bombing in Lebanon.] So, unaware of the duration myself, it is about time that some questioning like this is taking place:

“Are we winning or losing the global war on terror?” That’s the key question that U.S. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld asks in an uncharacteristically gloomy memo he recently sent to his closest Pentagon advisers. And the answer, it seems, is far from clear. In the memo, which appeared in yesterday’s (22 October) issue of “USA Today,” Rumsfeld asks top aides like Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz –- who is seen as a chief architect of the Iraq policy — to think of new ways to fight the war on terror. He says Washington will eventually win its wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, but that it will be a “long, hard slog.” But Rumsfeld also appears to suggest — for the first time – that the United States may be fighting its war on terrorism in the wrong way, by focusing too much on military operations and not enough on diplomatic efforts and other forms of pressure. He also wonders if the Pentagon can be reshaped fast enough to meet the terrorist threat. Joseph Biden, the top Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said Rumsfeld appears to have had an “epiphany,” adding that while Rumsfeld may not yet have shifted policy, the memo is “the first bit of introspection that I’ve even whiffed coming out of the Defense Department.”

You would want to think that these are questions being asked before during and after any big decisions made by government. Usually they are, usually most decsions are made in good faith with best information…but why is so difficult seeing it to be done that way in public? Is that why West Wing is so popular in that it provides a comforting template for layering on the news of the day? Sort of the other end of the humanization of the decision process as that Tim Horton’s commercial as the Canadian navy in the Gulf getting its double-double. We want to know humans are involved.

Another intersting thing is the source of my quotation, Radio Free Europe, one of the few real US state / state-ish news agencies, set up to fight the commies with a form of the truth via shortwave transmissions, now hanging on being just a moderate reliable news source so Swiss and Finns who speak English will know.